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Torngat Mountains National Park

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Tour details
Destinations: Torngat Mountains National Park
Guide language: English
Duration: 9 days
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Back to Newfoundland & Labrador Torngat Mountains National Park 6 or 9 nights Torngat Mountains National Park is situated at the northern tip of Labrador, Canada's newest national treasure- a stunning combinatin of wilderness seacoast, surreal turquoise lakes and fjords. But this destination and it's treasures are age old to the Inuit, whose stories and language speak of this land - it's wildlife, it's spirits, it's mysteries and it's legends. Now, thanks to the creation of a seasonal base camp operation and research station, you can experience the Torngats first hand. Imagine being able to see polar bears during the summer months. Until you've journeyed noth, it is fiddicult to imagine the spectacular lanscapes and Natural Wonders that define the Torngat Mountains... Until you've seen this landscape through the lens of your Inuit hosts - as the heartland of Inuit Culture - it is impossible to understand the deep connections between language, tradition and landscape that define the rhythm of this land.  // Hebron Mission  In 1959, after consulting the Canadian Government, the Moravians decided to close the mission, and the people of Hebron were required to move. The closure of the community and resettlement of it's members was a tragic event that has had far-reaching consequences for many Labrador Inuit. In the 1970's, Hebron was declared a National Historic Site. The remaining Moravian building represents one of the most historically significant mission-built structures int he province and is the oldest mission building in North America. The significance of Hebron, howwver, goes beyond this, and it remains a very special place to many Labrador Inuit. During the summer months, the Nunatsiavut Government employs previous residents to reside in Hebron again and provide visitors with guided tours.  You can get to Hebron from Base Camp a variety of ways: By passenger Boat/ Long Liner the voyage is approx. 3 hours one way. By Zodiac (when the seas are calm) the viage is approx. 1.3 hours one way. Flying time by helicopter is 15 minutes one way. North Arm North Arm is considered to be one of the jewels of Torngat Mountains National Park. Your excursion there will take you through a narrow and majestic fjord with 3000 foot walls on either side - the view is simply breathtaking.  You will hike (considered an easy level) to the beautiful waterfalls and a lake with a stunning sandy beach and incredible indigo- blue water. Each year, a number of brave visitors are courageous enough to take a dip in this clear and crisp water. If you don't feel like hiking, North Arm also offers a glimpse into the past with many remnants of ancient Inuit  food caches and blings made from stone where Inuit used to wait for caribou. There are also traces of an Arctic chair weir fishery, Arctic Chair is in abundance at this river head and is caught right on the beach and cooked in the traditional Inuit way, on flat stones over an open fire. This precious resource sometimes attracts predators such as black bears and the occastional polar bear. Keep your camera and bonoculars handy at all times! You can get to North Arm from Base Camp in a variety of ways:  By passenger boat/ Long Liner - The Voyage is a beautiful 3 hour trip into Saglek Fjord one way By zodiac the voyage is approx. 1 hour one way Flying time by helicopter is approx. 15-20 minutes one way // Sallikuluk (Rose Island) Sallikuluk is a focal point of the Inuit cultural landscape in Saglek Fjord. Deeply layered archaeological sites span more than 5000 years of occupation and are an important part of understanding the human history of the Torngat Mountains. Although relatively small in size, the island has traces of two villages of sod houses, numerous individual graves, and a mass reburial site. In the recent past, Sallikuluk was home to Inuit who hunted whales and seals in the cold and ice packed waters of the Labrador Sea. Sallikuluk's spectacular natural setting and rich cultural resources create a tangible sense of peace. The significance of this special island, dwarfed by the spectacular cliff faces that rise from Saglek Fjord, is evident in the stories told by Inuit Elders who cherish the island as important landscape to be protected for future generations. For these Inuit, Sallikuluk is an essential place from which and about which they can share their stories, which are often sparked by emotional reunions with the land where they and their ancestors once lived. A visit to Sallikuluk will give you a unique opportunity to see the physical traces of Inuit settlement on the land and hear important Inuit stories that will deepen your understanding of the cultural landscape that surrounds you. Accessible by boat from Base Camp, Sallikuluk is a popular day trip. By Passenger Boat/Long Liner the voyage is approx. 1 hour one way By Zodiac, depending on sea conditions, the voyage is approx. 20 minutes one way Nachvak Brook Nachvak Brook is a spectacular excursion which will take you to the north side of the Saglek Fiord. Here, you will see the beginning of the 100‐year‐old Inuit trail that once connected the Inuit of Ungava Bay to the Inuit of Labrador. A short hike along the trail will bring you to a large inukshuk that has marked the significance of the trail for decades. Each year, local Inuit check on the stability of the inukshuk as it has become a favourite place for bears to scratch their backs! Nachvak Brook is also home to many of the Inuit from the area and you can walk with some of the people who were born there. Fish are in great abundance at the mouth of the brook and you are likley to see black bears fishing there as well. The banks are a great area for denning and wolves have been spotted scavenging along the river as well as fishing for char or snatching leftovers from bears. Nachvak Brook is easily accessible by boat or helicopter from Base Camp: By Passenger boat/Long Liner the voyage is approx. 2 hours one way By Zodiac the voyage is approx. 30 minutes one way Flying time by helicopter is approx. 15 minutes one way Ramah Ramah is one of the most significant historical sites in northern Labrador and has one of the most accessible outcrops of a stone called Ramah Chert. This stone has been linked to the economic and spiritual needs of many of the ancestral Inuit who lived in Labrador before the arrival of the Europeans in the 18th Century. Ramah Chert has been found in ceremonial contexts at Native American sites as far away as New England, the Chesapeake Bay and the Great Lakes. The history of the distribution of this stone is one of the most intriguing examples of long‐distance exchange in ancient North America. Ramah also was home to a small mission run by the Moravian Church from 1871 until 1908. Ramah is situated further north into the park and is best accessible by either passenger boat /long liner or by helicopter. Unless you go by helicopter, it is an overnight trip. By Passenger boat/Long Liner the voyage is approx. 6 ‐7 hours one way Flying time by helicopter is approx. 25 minutes one way, over breath‐taking scenic mountains WILDLIFE With its rugged barren mountains, rocky tundra valleys, deep cold fjords and stormy maritime climate, Torngat Mountains National Park presents a serious challenge for some wildlife. The park lies along the annual migration route of many arctic and boreal species. Spring brings a rich period of plant and animal productivity, both on land and in the sea, and many animals arrive to enjoy the bounty of the land. Barren-ground black bears emerge from their dens after a six-month hibernation. Torngat Mountain caribou return from their wintering grounds along Ungava Bay to calve in the upper mountain barrens. Bands of George River caribou may wander into the park after calving to the south in June. Wolves follow the caribou. Voles and lemmings emerge from a winter under the snow. Red foxes and Arctic foxes, who have eked out a living over winter, now pursue the summer rodents.   In the bays and fjords, seals and whales move northward along the coast, chasing the summer flush of food as it moves north. Ringed seals and hooded seals follow the retreating ice northward. Harp seals follow a month or so later, but harbour seals may linger along the coast. Minke whales also tend to linger in bays and fiords, but larger fin and humpback whales may stay offshore. Arctic char move into the more productive coastal saltwater from their freshwater spawning grounds.  Dozens of bird species breed in Torngat Mountains National Park, including several identified as species at risk. Harlequin ducks nest along rivers in the southern part of the park, and the northern coast is an important moulting area. Other special winged residents include Barrow's goldeneye and short-eared owls, and peregrine falcons. GEOLOGY Only two places in the world can claim rocks older than those in the Torngat Mountains, and they encompasses eighty percent of the earth's geologic history. The rocks of the park have preserved, in their fabric and minerals, textbook examples of the cycles of mountain building events. These events represent a synopsis of plate tectonics from initial continental rifting, ocean formation and spreading, through ocean closure and destruction, erosion, and deposition before rifting begins again, culminating in the formation of the Labrador Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. This slow repetition of tectonic events is called the Wilson Cycle, and there are few places where it can be seen as clearly in the rock record as in the Torngat Mountains.   Along the outer coastline, cliffs rise straight from the sea, sometimes reaching 600 m. Their wind and wave-scoured faces reveal the intricate patterns of geologic processes long completed. Cutting through these ancient rocks, the black tentacles of younger dykes were injected into the surrounding rocks during the last mountain building event. These mountains also provide natural resources that humans have relied upon for thousands of years. Starting with the Maritime Archaic people, Chert was gathered for tools and exported to others as far south as New England. Soapstone was quarried to make oil lamps. Quartzite, pyrite, slate, steatite, nephrite, mica and graphite were used for a variety of purposes, and a mineral called labradorite is still used for jewellery and sculpture carving. VEGETATION For millennia, the Inuit have known and used the plants of the Torngat Mountains. Formal scientific study of the fauna here began in the late 1700's. About 300 species of vascular plants (including ferns and flowering plants) and 220 species of mosses and liverworts are known to grow in the park area. There is no real forest in the park, except for dwarf spruce close to the Quebec border, but wildflowers are one of the spectacular attractions of the Torngats. At the heads of fjords, raised beaches and terraces are covered in sedge and grass meadows, often showing signs of long human habitation. During the short summer, plants here must grow, flower and produce seeds quickly. Most are short, taking advantage of the warmth and wind shelter that they find close to the ground.  More information: Dates: 20/27 July  3/10/17 August PRICE PER PERSON SHARING  -        £4545.00 SINGLE SUPPLEMENT-                    £  995.00 Tuttuk - 6 nights This package includes: 2 nights in Goose Bay - One at the begining and one at the end of your trip, return air transportaion from Goose Bay to Saglek, boat transfer from Saglek to Torngat Mountains Base Camp & Research Station, all meals, insulated and heated Design Shelter or Intershelter tents. A helicopter tour and a choise of 3 excursions from the following: Hebron, North Arm, Rose Island, Nachvak Brook and Ramah are also included.  Note: The helicopter tour requires a minimum of 4 passengers to commence.  GETTING THERE: You can get to Goose Bay the same day by flying with Air Canada via Halifax - we can arrange air travel for you - we would strongly reccommend combining your trip to Torngat with time in Newfoundland.
All tour descriptions and conditions are given in accordance with the information of Windows on the wild
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